Glamping on the Santa Barbara Coast Since 2001

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Stay Smart. Stay Safe.

Canyon Resources

Staying at El Capitan Canyon is a unique experience. You can familiarize yourself with life at the Canyon with these tips and advice on our guest policies, a list of what you might want to bring along, the local wildlife, and other details to make your stay more comfortable.

Guest Policies & Information

Welcome to the canyon. We’re happy to have you here with us. Please help us make your stay safe and comfortable by participating in the following guidelines.

Check-in / Check-out
Check in is at 4:00pm, check out is 11:00am

Maximum Occupancy
Our accommodations range in style and size with a maximum occupancy of 3 to 6 people accordingly.

Outside Guests
Access to the Canyon beyond the Canyon Market is reserved exclusively for our registered guests. Please plan to meet any visitors at the Canyon Market or in the surrounding garden. Thank you!

Parking
El Capitan Canyon has adopted a “car-free” policy to maximize guest safety and preserve the natural ambiance of the Canyon. After checking in, you will be escorted to your accommodations by one of our Kiosk staff. Once you’ve unloaded your belongings, we ask that you park in a designated parking area. When driving through the Canyon, we ask you to observe the 5mph speed limit.

Quiet Time
Our quiet time begins at 10pm. Out of respect for all of our guests, we have a No Tolerance policy. This will be strictly enforced.

Music
No amplified sound is allowed in the Canyon.

Movies
To preserve the Canyon experience for all of our guests, the airing of outdoor movies at individual sites or common areas is not permitted.

Pet Policy
For the safety of pets and wildlife, we do not allow pets in the Canyon.

Wildlife
The Canyon is home to many native species of animals, birds and insects. Please do not touch or feed the wildlife while you enjoy and observe any local creatures. We recommend keeping your cabin door closed and food secured to help avoid any unwanted visitors. If you have any questions or concerns during your stay, please contact us.

Non-Smoking Policy
Smoking is not allowed in any accommodations or on the Canyon property.

Fire Safety
Due to the high wildfire risk, we ask you to closely observe and carefully tend to any campfires or BBQ’s that you use. NEVER LEAVE A CAMPFIRE OR OPEN FLAME UNATTENDED. Fire regulations dictate that there be no candles or open flame of any kind in any accommodation.

At Your Site
Camping Tents and Slack Lines are strictly prohibited in the Canyon. For everyone’s safety, please take down any hammocks when not in use and absolutely before dark.

Cabins with a Fireplace
To use the fireplace, first locate the wall-mounted temperature control box. Slide bottom lever to ignite, raise or lower flame and temperature.

Alcohol
Alcoholic beverages are allowed in the Canyon and must be transported here in closed containers. Beer and wine may be purchased at the Canyon Market. Please drink responsibly. Drinking and driving is strictly forbidden in the Canyon.

Pool Hours
The Pool is open from 10am to 10pm. No lifeguard is on duty. All glass and breakable items are forbidden in the pool area. Please observe safety signs. Children (12 years and younger) must be supervised by an adult at all times.

Biking
Bikes are available free of charge for guest use from the Kiosk on a first come, first served basis. Bikes may be checked out for a maximum of two hours at a time. A Driver’s License or ID card is required to check out bikes. In compliance with California state law, anyone 17 years or younger is required to wear a helmet. Adults are encouraged to do the same.

Electric Car Charging
For information regarding charging an electric vehicle while staying on property, please contact the kiosk for assistance.

Wi-Fi Access
El Capitan Canyon is equipped with Wi-Fi throughout the Canyon. Please see the guest instruction card in each room for more information.

What To Bring

Suggested List of Items to Bring

El Capitan Canyon seeks to provide its guests with a unique resort experience. We strive to meld the comforts of a traditional hotel with the relaxation and adventure of camping. The items you will need to fully enjoy your time at El Capitan Canyon are different from those needed at a standard hotel. Please use the list below as a checklist when preparing for your retreat.

IN YOUR CABIN

All our cabins are equipped with a kitchenette that includes a microwave, a coffee maker with coffee and paper cups, bar-sized fridge and small sink. There is no stove or hotplate inside the cabin. Most of our guests use the fire-pit and grill provided in front of their cabin or tent, or they bring a camping stove (not for use inside the cabin). Other items that you will need to bring if you plan on cooking your own meals include:

  • Dishes, silverware and napkins – a picnic set is ideal, or use disposable items
  • Cookware – pots, pans, spatulas, grilling implements, aluminum foil, etc.
  • Clean up items – dish soap, sponge, paper towels, dish towels.
  • Firewood or charcoal – bring your own or buy it at our Canyon Market

If you are staying in one of our Deluxe Safari Tents, you will also need to bring a cooler for your perishable items. Ice is available at our Canyon Market.

The beds in your cabin or tent are fully furnished with pillows, luxury linens and blankets. They will be made and ready for use upon your arrival, and we perform daily housekeeping service of all our accommodations. If you plan to use the sleeping loft (available in Queen, Bunk and Loft Cabins) or a cot, bedding will be provided but guest will need to make up their own bed. We provide bath towels for your use, but we recommend bringing your own beach towels for the pool or beach.

IN THE CANYON

The weather in Santa Barbara can vary from chilly in the early morning and evening, to quite warm during the day. Comfortable layered clothing is the best option for this type of climate. A sweater or light jacket is recommended for the evenings.

El Capitan Canyon provides beach cruiser bikes free of charge for our guests to use. Our bikes are all adult-size, so children will need to bring their own bikes. Please see the Kiosk staff for information on borrowing a bike.

Other items that we recommend include:

  • Flashlight
  • Hat
  • Sunscreen
  • Walking Shoes
  • Insect Repellent
  • Lighter or Matches
  • Sunglasses
  • First Aid Kit
  • Helmets for Bike Riders
  • Water Bottles
  • Swimsuit Pool and Beach Toys

For further questions, please contact our friendly Front Desk Staff toll free at (866) 352-2729

Wildlife & Nature of the Canyon

The Canyon is home to many native species of animals, birds and insects. Animal watchers can enjoy a variety of local residents like squirrels, birds, and deer. The Canyon Market has a selection of trail guides to help you identify some of the wildlife that calls the Canyon home.

The soundtrack of nature is set to shuffle at El Capitan Canyon. Local and migratory birds bring unique bird calls at different times of the year. You may hear woodpeckers knocking away at a nearby tree. At night, the cricket frogs in the creek may call out with sounds similar to clicking marbles. Seasonally, you will experience the relaxing sound of a babbling brook rising from El Capitan Creek.

Please do not touch or feed the wildlife while you enjoy and observe any local creatures. We recommend keeping your cabin door closed and food secured to help avoid any unwanted visitors. If you have any questions or concerns during your stay, please contact us.

While we are fortunate to have an abundance of wildlife and native plants this variety includes poison oak, rattlesnakes, ticks, and mountain lions. In the unlikely event you see a Rattlesnake, Mountain Lion or Bear near your accommodations, please notify the kiosk.

Poison Oak

Poison oak is prevalent throughout the Canyon, especially in the creek beds. Please don’t let children run in and around the creek unobserved. Make sure that they recognize this most unforgiving weed and understand the consequences of touching it. If you are unsure of what poison oak looks like, have one of our staff point it out to you. The leaves are about a third of an inch to two inches. The leaves of the poison oak are compound. They are usually made up of three leaflets. This is why you should follow the saying, “three leaves let them be”, when hiking in the forest. The flowers of the poison oak are white-green and grow like berries on very thin stems. The berries are white and glossy. In the summer, they take on a raisin-like appearance.

In the fall, poison oak is a yellowish red. In the winter, the sticks are bare. The way you can tell if an ordinary stick is poison oak is if it has three branches (kind of like the leaves). In the spring, they take on a beautiful appearance by producing white apple blossom looking flowers. During the summer, poison oak loses its flowers, and its leaves turn maroon to a fire engine red. In the winter, poison oak loses all its leaves and can be dangerously deceiving because it looks like a regular bare stick. The scary fact is that it is still communicable. In the fall, poison oak becomes a yellowish brown. Poison oak can also climb. It is common to find poison oak climbing along the walls of abandoned or deserted buildings.

Mountain Lions

Occasionally, one might have the rare opportunity to observe a Mountain Lion. Some guidance to avoid a direct encounter and the best things to do are provided for your awareness.

  • DO NOT HIKE ALONE: Go in groups, with adults supervising children.
  • KEEP CHILDREN CLOSE TO YOU: Observations of captured wild mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • DO NOT APPROACH A LION: Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • DO NOT RUN FROM A LION: Running may stimulate a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the mountain lion.
  • DO NOT CROUCH DOWN OR BEND OVER: In Nepal, a researcher studying tigers and leopards watched the big cats kill cattle and domestic water buffalo while ignoring humans standing nearby. He surmised that a human standing up, is just not the right shape for a cat’s prey. On the other hand, a person squatting or bending over looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal. If you’re in mountain lion country, avoid squatting, crouching or bending over, even when picking up children.
  • DO ALL YOU CAN TO APPEAR LARGER: Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Again, pick up small children. Throw stones, branches, or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice. The idea is to convince the mountain lion that you are not prey and that you may be a danger to it.
  • FIGHT BACK IF ATTACKED: A hiker in Southern California used a rock to fend off a mountain lion that was attacking his son. Others have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes do inhabit the hills surrounding the Canyon. Stick to well-developed trails. If you run across any snakes, keep your distance and leave them alone. If you are bitten by a rattlesnake and you are less than one hour from the nearest emergency room, initial treatment is relatively simple:

  • Remain Calm.
  • Gently wash the area with soap and water.
  • Apply a cold, wet cloth over the bite.
  • Transport to the nearest emergency facility for further treatment.

What should NOT be done after a rattlesnake bite? Several DON’Ts are very important to remember:

  • DON’T apply a tourniquet.
  • DON’T pack the bite area in ice.
  • DON’T cut the wound with a knife or razor.
  • DON’T use your mouth to suck out the venom.
  • DON’T let the victim drink alcohol.
  • DON’T apply electric shock.

Ticks, Lyme Disease & Prevention

The chances that you might acquire Lyme disease from a single tick bite depend on the type of tick, where you acquire it, and how long it was attached to you. Many types of ticks bite people in the U.S., but only blacklegged ticks transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Only blacklegged ticks in the highly endemic areas of northeastern and north central U.S. are commonly infected.

Blacklegged ticks need to be attached for at least 24 hours before they can transmit Lyme disease. This is why it’s so important to remove them promptly and to check your body daily for ticks.

If you develop illness within a few weeks of a tick bite, see your health care provider right away. Common symptoms of Lyme disease include a rash, fever, body aches, facial paralysis, and arthritis. Ticks can also transmit other diseases, so it’s important to be alert for any illness that follows a tick bite.

Just as it is important to correctly diagnose Lyme disease when a patient has it, it is important to avoid misdiagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease when the true cause of illness is something else. Patients treated with appropriate antibiotics, in the early stages of Lyme disease usually recover rapidly and completely.

Black Bears

Black bears can travel nearby and on rare occasions through the canyon. They visit the creek as a water source. Some guidance to avoid a direct encounter and the best things to do are provided for your awareness. (Source – US National Park Service)

It is critical to remember that bears are wild and can be dangerous. Their behavior is sometimes unpredictable. Each bear and each experience is unique; there is no single strategy that will work in all situations and that guarantees safety. Most bear encounters end without injury. Following some basic guidelines may help to lessen the threat of danger. Your safety can depend on your ability to calm the bear.

Keeping your distance and not surprising bears are some of the most important things you can do. Most bears will avoid humans if they hear them coming. Pay attention to your surroundings.
Once a bear has noticed you and is paying attention to you, additional strategies can help prevent the situation from escalating.

  • IDENTIFY YOURSELF by talking calmly so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal. Remain still; stand your ground but slowly wave your arms. Help the bear recognize you as a human. It may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell. A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening.
  • STAY CALM and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Bears may bluff their way out of an encounter by charging and then turning away at the last second. Bears may also react defensively by woofing, yawning, salivating, growling, snapping their jaws, and laying their ears back. Continue to talk to the bear in low tones; this will help you stay calmer, and it won’t be threatening to the bear. A scream or sudden movement may trigger an attack. Never imitate bear sounds or make a high-pitched squeal.
  • PICK UP SMALL CHILDREN immediately.
  • HIKE AND TRAVEL IN GROUPS. Groups of people are usually noisier and smellier than a single person. Therefore, bears often become aware of groups of people at greater distances, and because of their cumulative size, groups are also intimidating to bears.
  • MAKE YOURSELVES LOOK AS LARGE AS POSSIBLE (for example, move to higher ground).
  • DO NOT ALLOW THE BEAR ACCESS TO YOUR FOOD. Getting your food will only encourage the bear and make the problem worse for others.
  • DO NOT DROP YOUR PACK as it can provide protection for your back and prevent a bear from accessing your food.
  • If the bear is stationary, move away slowly and sideways; this allows you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears. Do NOT run, but if the bear follows, stop and hold your ground. Bears can run as fast as a racehorse both uphill and down. Like dogs, they will chase fleeing animals. Do NOT climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees.
  • Leave the area or take a detour. If this is impossible, wait until the bear moves away. Always leave the bear an escape route.
  • Be especially cautious if you see a female with cubs; never place yourself between a mother and her cub, and never attempt to approach them. The chances of an attack escalate greatly if she perceives you as a danger to her cubs.

Bear attacks are rare; most bears are only interested in protecting food, cubs, or their space. If you are attacked by a black bear, DO NOT PLAY DEAD. Try to escape to a secure place such as a car or building. If escape is not possible, try to fight back using any object available. Concentrate your kicks and blows on the bear’s face and muzzle. Above all, keep your distance from bears!

Canyon Wi-Fi Access Information

El Capitan Canyon is equipped with a premium Wi-Fi system throughout the Canyon to allow our valued guests to stay connected while traveling. We offer plans to allow users with basic needs to access the service at no charge. Users wishing to stream video can do so with no data cap and for a reasonable fee.
Steps to connect to the internet:

  1. Turn on your computer or restart if it is on standby.
  2. Select the ElCapitanCanyon Wi-Fi Network and Click “Connect”
  3. Open your browser (example: Chrome, Safari, or Internet Explorer). Note: If the welcome page does not automatically appear, erase everything in the address bar and type: start.tengointernet.com
  4. If you have previously created a Wi-Fi account at this property, select “Login” and enter your username and password. Otherwise, if you are a first-time user, select “Register” and create your Wi-Fi account.
  5. Select a Wi-Fi plan on the following screen.
  • If you select a FREE plan, click “Launch Session” and you will be taken to the internet.
  • If you select a PAID plan, click “Launch Session” and you will be taken to a page to enter your billing and credit card information.

FAQ

Why don’t I see a wireless network to connect to?
Make sure your Wi-Fi adapter is turned on. All Wi-Fi equipped internet devices have a switch, button, or setting option that allows you to turn off or on the Wi-Fi adapter. Please contact your device manufacturer for additional information.

Why can I not sign in as a returning guest?
If you are returning to the resort and it has been a few months or longer since you’ve utilized our services, please be sure you have the appropriate registered email address and the current password to access the network.

Please note that multiple local factors impact actual speeds available to the end-user; including the end-user’s individual device, and as such, speed thresholds noted in the plans above are sold on an “up to” basis and not guaranteed.

Having trouble? Please contact TengoInternet at (866) 968-3646 for additional assistance.

Canyon Weather

The seasons of the Central Coast of California are like no place else in the country. Our year-round weather is generally mild with enough variety to make multiple visits throughout the year a unique experience each trip.

 

In the Summertime, cool coastal mornings transform into warm afternoons bringing mild ocean breezes and plenty of sunshine. This is the time when families come together at El Capitan Canyon to enjoy a camp-like atmosphere complete with activities such as stargazing, docent led hikes and summer concerts. In the evenings, enjoy a crackling fire, roast some marshmallows and enjoy the spectacular show of stars overhead. Our beautiful location and friendly staff are ready to provide everything you need for a great family vacation and beautiful memories for years to come.

 

The Autumn season brings cooler nights and fall color to the Canyon. It’s the perfect time to sip on something warm in front of a flickering campfire or take a meandering stroll along our walking trails to experience the season in the changing color of our sycamore trees. Choose a local wine from our well-curated wine collection in the Canyon Market or indulge in a relaxing massage at our signature Canyon Spa. Celebrate the fall in camping style at El Capitan Canyon!

 

The magic of the Winter season brings crisp, clear days and the most beautiful sunsets of the year! Best of all, is the blanket of stars in the clear night sky, which can be easily enjoyed beside your private campfire or on an evening stroll along our meandering paths. Take a pause from this busy season and surround yourself in the Canyon’s beautiful natural setting to truly enjoy and appreciate this special time of year!

 

Experience the freshness of Spring when the leaves are budding on the sycamore and oak trees overhead. It’s a great time to surround yourself in the serenity of the great outdoors! Choose a local wine from our well-curated wine collection in the Canyon Market or indulge in a relaxing massage at our signature Canyon Spa. Celebrate the season in camping style at El Capitan Canyon!

 

Santa Barbara
67°
Partly Cloudy
06:3016:55 PST
Feels like: 67°F
Wind: 5mph S
Humidity: 67%
Pressure: 30.02"Hg
UV index: 3
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67°F
67°F
66°F
66°F
66°F
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67/53°F
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79/54°F
Canyon Policies

Guest Policies & Information

Welcome to the canyon. We’re happy to have you here with us. Please help us make your stay safe and comfortable by participating in the following guidelines.

Check-in / Check-out
Check in is at 4:00pm, check out is 11:00am

Maximum Occupancy
Our accommodations range in style and size with a maximum occupancy of 3 to 6 people accordingly.

Outside Guests
Access to the Canyon beyond the Canyon Market is reserved exclusively for our registered guests. Please plan to meet any visitors at the Canyon Market or in the surrounding garden. Thank you!

Parking
El Capitan Canyon has adopted a “car-free” policy to maximize guest safety and preserve the natural ambiance of the Canyon. After checking in, you will be escorted to your accommodations by one of our Kiosk staff. Once you’ve unloaded your belongings, we ask that you park in a designated parking area. When driving through the Canyon, we ask you to observe the 5mph speed limit.

Quiet Time
Our quiet time begins at 10pm. Out of respect for all of our guests, we have a No Tolerance policy. This will be strictly enforced.

Music
No amplified sound is allowed in the Canyon.

Movies
To preserve the Canyon experience for all of our guests, the airing of outdoor movies at individual sites or common areas is not permitted.

Pet Policy
For the safety of pets and wildlife, we do not allow pets in the Canyon.

Wildlife
The Canyon is home to many native species of animals, birds and insects. Please do not touch or feed the wildlife while you enjoy and observe any local creatures. We recommend keeping your cabin door closed and food secured to help avoid any unwanted visitors. If you have any questions or concerns during your stay, please contact us.

Non-Smoking Policy
Smoking is not allowed in any accommodations or on the Canyon property.

Fire Safety
Due to the high wildfire risk, we ask you to closely observe and carefully tend to any campfires or BBQ’s that you use. NEVER LEAVE A CAMPFIRE OR OPEN FLAME UNATTENDED. Fire regulations dictate that there be no candles or open flame of any kind in any accommodation.

At Your Site
Camping Tents and Slack Lines are strictly prohibited in the Canyon. For everyone’s safety, please take down any hammocks when not in use and absolutely before dark.

Cabins with a Fireplace
To use the fireplace, first locate the wall-mounted temperature control box. Slide bottom lever to ignite, raise or lower flame and temperature.

Alcohol
Alcoholic beverages are allowed in the Canyon and must be transported here in closed containers. Beer and wine may be purchased at the Canyon Market. Please drink responsibly. Drinking and driving is strictly forbidden in the Canyon.

Pool Hours
The Pool is open from 10am to 10pm. No lifeguard is on duty. All glass and breakable items are forbidden in the pool area. Please observe safety signs. Children (12 years and younger) must be supervised by an adult at all times.

Biking
Bikes are available free of charge for guest use from the Kiosk on a first come, first served basis. Bikes may be checked out for a maximum of two hours at a time. A Driver’s License or ID card is required to check out bikes. In compliance with California state law, anyone 17 years or younger is required to wear a helmet. Adults are encouraged to do the same.

Electric Car Charging
For information regarding charging an electric vehicle while staying on property, please contact the kiosk for assistance.

Wi-Fi Access
El Capitan Canyon is equipped with Wi-Fi throughout the Canyon. Please see the guest instruction card in each room for more information.

What To Bring

What To Bring

Suggested List of Items to Bring

El Capitan Canyon seeks to provide its guests with a unique resort experience. We strive to meld the comforts of a traditional hotel with the relaxation and adventure of camping. The items you will need to fully enjoy your time at El Capitan Canyon are different from those needed at a standard hotel. Please use the list below as a checklist when preparing for your retreat.

IN YOUR CABIN

All our cabins are equipped with a kitchenette that includes a microwave, a coffee maker with coffee and paper cups, bar-sized fridge and small sink. There is no stove or hotplate inside the cabin. Most of our guests use the fire-pit and grill provided in front of their cabin or tent, or they bring a camping stove (not for use inside the cabin). Other items that you will need to bring if you plan on cooking your own meals include:

  • Dishes, silverware and napkins – a picnic set is ideal, or use disposable items
  • Cookware – pots, pans, spatulas, grilling implements, aluminum foil, etc.
  • Clean up items – dish soap, sponge, paper towels, dish towels.
  • Firewood or charcoal – bring your own or buy it at our Canyon Market

If you are staying in one of our Deluxe Safari Tents, you will also need to bring a cooler for your perishable items. Ice is available at our Canyon Market.

The beds in your cabin or tent are fully furnished with pillows, luxury linens and blankets. They will be made and ready for use upon your arrival, and we perform daily housekeeping service of all our accommodations. If you plan to use the sleeping loft (available in Queen, Bunk and Loft Cabins) or a cot, bedding will be provided but guest will need to make up their own bed. We provide bath towels for your use, but we recommend bringing your own beach towels for the pool or beach.

IN THE CANYON

The weather in Santa Barbara can vary from chilly in the early morning and evening, to quite warm during the day. Comfortable layered clothing is the best option for this type of climate. A sweater or light jacket is recommended for the evenings.

El Capitan Canyon provides beach cruiser bikes free of charge for our guests to use. Our bikes are all adult-size, so children will need to bring their own bikes. Please see the Kiosk staff for information on borrowing a bike.

Other items that we recommend include:

  • Flashlight
  • Hat
  • Sunscreen
  • Walking Shoes
  • Insect Repellent
  • Lighter or Matches
  • Sunglasses
  • First Aid Kit
  • Helmets for Bike Riders
  • Water Bottles
  • Swimsuit Pool and Beach Toys

For further questions, please contact our friendly Front Desk Staff toll free at (866) 352-2729

Wildlife

Wildlife & Nature of the Canyon

The Canyon is home to many native species of animals, birds and insects. Animal watchers can enjoy a variety of local residents like squirrels, birds, and deer. The Canyon Market has a selection of trail guides to help you identify some of the wildlife that calls the Canyon home.

The soundtrack of nature is set to shuffle at El Capitan Canyon. Local and migratory birds bring unique bird calls at different times of the year. You may hear woodpeckers knocking away at a nearby tree. At night, the cricket frogs in the creek may call out with sounds similar to clicking marbles. Seasonally, you will experience the relaxing sound of a babbling brook rising from El Capitan Creek.

Please do not touch or feed the wildlife while you enjoy and observe any local creatures. We recommend keeping your cabin door closed and food secured to help avoid any unwanted visitors. If you have any questions or concerns during your stay, please contact us.

While we are fortunate to have an abundance of wildlife and native plants this variety includes poison oak, rattlesnakes, ticks, and mountain lions. In the unlikely event you see a Rattlesnake, Mountain Lion or Bear near your accommodations, please notify the kiosk.

Poison Oak

Poison oak is prevalent throughout the Canyon, especially in the creek beds. Please don’t let children run in and around the creek unobserved. Make sure that they recognize this most unforgiving weed and understand the consequences of touching it. If you are unsure of what poison oak looks like, have one of our staff point it out to you. The leaves are about a third of an inch to two inches. The leaves of the poison oak are compound. They are usually made up of three leaflets. This is why you should follow the saying, “three leaves let them be”, when hiking in the forest. The flowers of the poison oak are white-green and grow like berries on very thin stems. The berries are white and glossy. In the summer, they take on a raisin-like appearance.

In the fall, poison oak is a yellowish red. In the winter, the sticks are bare. The way you can tell if an ordinary stick is poison oak is if it has three branches (kind of like the leaves). In the spring, they take on a beautiful appearance by producing white apple blossom looking flowers. During the summer, poison oak loses its flowers, and its leaves turn maroon to a fire engine red. In the winter, poison oak loses all its leaves and can be dangerously deceiving because it looks like a regular bare stick. The scary fact is that it is still communicable. In the fall, poison oak becomes a yellowish brown. Poison oak can also climb. It is common to find poison oak climbing along the walls of abandoned or deserted buildings.

Mountain Lions

Occasionally, one might have the rare opportunity to observe a Mountain Lion. Some guidance to avoid a direct encounter and the best things to do are provided for your awareness.

  • DO NOT HIKE ALONE: Go in groups, with adults supervising children.
  • KEEP CHILDREN CLOSE TO YOU: Observations of captured wild mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • DO NOT APPROACH A LION: Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • DO NOT RUN FROM A LION: Running may stimulate a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the mountain lion.
  • DO NOT CROUCH DOWN OR BEND OVER: In Nepal, a researcher studying tigers and leopards watched the big cats kill cattle and domestic water buffalo while ignoring humans standing nearby. He surmised that a human standing up, is just not the right shape for a cat’s prey. On the other hand, a person squatting or bending over looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal. If you’re in mountain lion country, avoid squatting, crouching or bending over, even when picking up children.
  • DO ALL YOU CAN TO APPEAR LARGER: Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Again, pick up small children. Throw stones, branches, or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice. The idea is to convince the mountain lion that you are not prey and that you may be a danger to it.
  • FIGHT BACK IF ATTACKED: A hiker in Southern California used a rock to fend off a mountain lion that was attacking his son. Others have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.

Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes do inhabit the hills surrounding the Canyon. Stick to well-developed trails. If you run across any snakes, keep your distance and leave them alone. If you are bitten by a rattlesnake and you are less than one hour from the nearest emergency room, initial treatment is relatively simple:

  • Remain Calm.
  • Gently wash the area with soap and water.
  • Apply a cold, wet cloth over the bite.
  • Transport to the nearest emergency facility for further treatment.

What should NOT be done after a rattlesnake bite? Several DON’Ts are very important to remember:

  • DON’T apply a tourniquet.
  • DON’T pack the bite area in ice.
  • DON’T cut the wound with a knife or razor.
  • DON’T use your mouth to suck out the venom.
  • DON’T let the victim drink alcohol.
  • DON’T apply electric shock.

Ticks, Lyme Disease & Prevention

The chances that you might acquire Lyme disease from a single tick bite depend on the type of tick, where you acquire it, and how long it was attached to you. Many types of ticks bite people in the U.S., but only blacklegged ticks transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Only blacklegged ticks in the highly endemic areas of northeastern and north central U.S. are commonly infected.

Blacklegged ticks need to be attached for at least 24 hours before they can transmit Lyme disease. This is why it’s so important to remove them promptly and to check your body daily for ticks.

If you develop illness within a few weeks of a tick bite, see your health care provider right away. Common symptoms of Lyme disease include a rash, fever, body aches, facial paralysis, and arthritis. Ticks can also transmit other diseases, so it’s important to be alert for any illness that follows a tick bite.

Just as it is important to correctly diagnose Lyme disease when a patient has it, it is important to avoid misdiagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease when the true cause of illness is something else. Patients treated with appropriate antibiotics, in the early stages of Lyme disease usually recover rapidly and completely.

Black Bears

Black bears can travel nearby and on rare occasions through the canyon. They visit the creek as a water source. Some guidance to avoid a direct encounter and the best things to do are provided for your awareness. (Source – US National Park Service)

It is critical to remember that bears are wild and can be dangerous. Their behavior is sometimes unpredictable. Each bear and each experience is unique; there is no single strategy that will work in all situations and that guarantees safety. Most bear encounters end without injury. Following some basic guidelines may help to lessen the threat of danger. Your safety can depend on your ability to calm the bear.

Keeping your distance and not surprising bears are some of the most important things you can do. Most bears will avoid humans if they hear them coming. Pay attention to your surroundings.
Once a bear has noticed you and is paying attention to you, additional strategies can help prevent the situation from escalating.

  • IDENTIFY YOURSELF by talking calmly so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal. Remain still; stand your ground but slowly wave your arms. Help the bear recognize you as a human. It may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell. A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening.
  • STAY CALM and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Bears may bluff their way out of an encounter by charging and then turning away at the last second. Bears may also react defensively by woofing, yawning, salivating, growling, snapping their jaws, and laying their ears back. Continue to talk to the bear in low tones; this will help you stay calmer, and it won’t be threatening to the bear. A scream or sudden movement may trigger an attack. Never imitate bear sounds or make a high-pitched squeal.
  • PICK UP SMALL CHILDREN immediately.
  • HIKE AND TRAVEL IN GROUPS. Groups of people are usually noisier and smellier than a single person. Therefore, bears often become aware of groups of people at greater distances, and because of their cumulative size, groups are also intimidating to bears.
  • MAKE YOURSELVES LOOK AS LARGE AS POSSIBLE (for example, move to higher ground).
  • DO NOT ALLOW THE BEAR ACCESS TO YOUR FOOD. Getting your food will only encourage the bear and make the problem worse for others.
  • DO NOT DROP YOUR PACK as it can provide protection for your back and prevent a bear from accessing your food.
  • If the bear is stationary, move away slowly and sideways; this allows you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears. Do NOT run, but if the bear follows, stop and hold your ground. Bears can run as fast as a racehorse both uphill and down. Like dogs, they will chase fleeing animals. Do NOT climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees.
  • Leave the area or take a detour. If this is impossible, wait until the bear moves away. Always leave the bear an escape route.
  • Be especially cautious if you see a female with cubs; never place yourself between a mother and her cub, and never attempt to approach them. The chances of an attack escalate greatly if she perceives you as a danger to her cubs.

Bear attacks are rare; most bears are only interested in protecting food, cubs, or their space. If you are attacked by a black bear, DO NOT PLAY DEAD. Try to escape to a secure place such as a car or building. If escape is not possible, try to fight back using any object available. Concentrate your kicks and blows on the bear’s face and muzzle. Above all, keep your distance from bears!

WiFi Access

Canyon Wi-Fi Access Information

El Capitan Canyon is equipped with a premium Wi-Fi system throughout the Canyon to allow our valued guests to stay connected while traveling. We offer plans to allow users with basic needs to access the service at no charge. Users wishing to stream video can do so with no data cap and for a reasonable fee.
Steps to connect to the internet:

  1. Turn on your computer or restart if it is on standby.
  2. Select the ElCapitanCanyon Wi-Fi Network and Click “Connect”
  3. Open your browser (example: Chrome, Safari, or Internet Explorer). Note: If the welcome page does not automatically appear, erase everything in the address bar and type: start.tengointernet.com
  4. If you have previously created a Wi-Fi account at this property, select “Login” and enter your username and password. Otherwise, if you are a first-time user, select “Register” and create your Wi-Fi account.
  5. Select a Wi-Fi plan on the following screen.
  • If you select a FREE plan, click “Launch Session” and you will be taken to the internet.
  • If you select a PAID plan, click “Launch Session” and you will be taken to a page to enter your billing and credit card information.

FAQ

Why don’t I see a wireless network to connect to?
Make sure your Wi-Fi adapter is turned on. All Wi-Fi equipped internet devices have a switch, button, or setting option that allows you to turn off or on the Wi-Fi adapter. Please contact your device manufacturer for additional information.

Why can I not sign in as a returning guest?
If you are returning to the resort and it has been a few months or longer since you’ve utilized our services, please be sure you have the appropriate registered email address and the current password to access the network.

Please note that multiple local factors impact actual speeds available to the end-user; including the end-user’s individual device, and as such, speed thresholds noted in the plans above are sold on an “up to” basis and not guaranteed.

Having trouble? Please contact TengoInternet at (866) 968-3646 for additional assistance.

Weather

Canyon Weather

The seasons of the Central Coast of California are like no place else in the country. Our year-round weather is generally mild with enough variety to make multiple visits throughout the year a unique experience each trip.

 

In the Summertime, cool coastal mornings transform into warm afternoons bringing mild ocean breezes and plenty of sunshine. This is the time when families come together at El Capitan Canyon to enjoy a camp-like atmosphere complete with activities such as stargazing, docent led hikes and summer concerts. In the evenings, enjoy a crackling fire, roast some marshmallows and enjoy the spectacular show of stars overhead. Our beautiful location and friendly staff are ready to provide everything you need for a great family vacation and beautiful memories for years to come.

 

The Autumn season brings cooler nights and fall color to the Canyon. It’s the perfect time to sip on something warm in front of a flickering campfire or take a meandering stroll along our walking trails to experience the season in the changing color of our sycamore trees. Choose a local wine from our well-curated wine collection in the Canyon Market or indulge in a relaxing massage at our signature Canyon Spa. Celebrate the fall in camping style at El Capitan Canyon!

 

The magic of the Winter season brings crisp, clear days and the most beautiful sunsets of the year! Best of all, is the blanket of stars in the clear night sky, which can be easily enjoyed beside your private campfire or on an evening stroll along our meandering paths. Take a pause from this busy season and surround yourself in the Canyon’s beautiful natural setting to truly enjoy and appreciate this special time of year!

 

Experience the freshness of Spring when the leaves are budding on the sycamore and oak trees overhead. It’s a great time to surround yourself in the serenity of the great outdoors! Choose a local wine from our well-curated wine collection in the Canyon Market or indulge in a relaxing massage at our signature Canyon Spa. Celebrate the season in camping style at El Capitan Canyon!

 

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